Insurance is an industry that hires a lot of telecommuters, and the work-from-home jobs available are quite a diverse lot, ranging from underwriters and appraisers to case managers and insurance agents, as well as positions in IT and project management. While many insurance companies hire these positions directly as work-at-home jobs, others may offer flexible options for existing employees or part-time telecommuting.
Your success in working from home might depend on the type of work you do, as discovered in a study by University of Illinois. The study found that telecommuters performed as well as their in-office co-workers. Phil Cicioria, Business & Law Editor at University of Illinois says, “According to the study, telecommuters want to be seen as “good citizens” of the company in order to justify their flexible work arrangements.”
“As a programmer, I need large chunks of time to really make progress on a project,” states Ann Gaffigan, CTO of Land Pros Systems, Inc., “In an office, there are so many potential distractions, with people knocking on the door or customers stopping in. This way I can control when I answer calls and emails and when I 'go silent' to get some work done.”
Multi-Specialty Coder (Per Diem) – Aviacode: “This position will provide high quality E/M, procedure and surgery coding across multiple specialties. The position will focus on several different specialties, including OB/GYN, Orthopedic Surgery, Pediatrics, Neurology and others. Coder will not need to know all specialties, but must have at least three specialties and be able to code E/M AND office procedure AND surgery for each of the specialties maintained.”
What It Is: Many companies pay online testers to make sure websites are intuitive and easy to navigate. "You basically follow the instructions you're given to check out the website," says Anna Thurman, founder of RealWaysToEarnMoneyOnline.com, a site that has reviewed more than 500 online work opportunities. "It usually only takes about 15 minutes per test." Thurman recommends registering with 10 to 12 different companies since the opportunities to test these sites are doled out first come, first served. "There are people who make $100 to $200 a month by staying on top of those tests," Thurman says.
While remote workers can be found in a number of different industries, it’s more prevalent in the tech-sphere. It could be due to the nature of most tech jobs—especially jobs for developers and programmers—that require a strong attention to detail and long hours of focus. Working from home can reduce the amount of distractions these workers face, allowing them to get more done during work hours.

If you're a good typist, you may be able to pick up a little cash from home using that skill. If you're a really great typist, well, then you may be able to earn some good money in transcription. In addition to general transcription, there are opportunities for transcribing in both the medical and legal fields. In some specialized fields, certification may be required.
Although working from home is not usually connected with the medical field, a surprising number of medical jobs can be performed from home. Such occupations include medical transcription, medical coding, and virtual nursing. Even some pharmacists work from home reviewing prescriptions, overseeing transfers from one pharmacy to another, and providing counseling on use of medications. Many of these jobs require some form of certification, training, schooling, and/or previous experience. 
In the annual Village Voice's Pazz & Jop mass critics poll of the year's best in music in 2016, "Work from Home" was tied at number 36, with six other songs.[50] The Arizona Republic[51] and The Fader[52] ranked the song at 28 and 23 in their year-end lists, respectively. Fact[53] ranked it at 34 and Spin[54] ranked it at 94. In its best pop singles list, Digital Spy[55] placed the song at number seven. Elle[56] placed the song in its unranked year-end list.
Maybe you have a commute that makes you frustrated before you even hit your desk, and all you can do while you drink your morning coffee is fantasize about what you could buy with all that gas money. For employees who work far from the office, cutting out the commute can make a world of difference for their stress and overall health. For Charlie Harary, CEO of H3 & Company and professor at the Syms School of Business at Yeshiva University, cutting down on how many days a week one of his employees needed to commute allowed one employee to get more done in her working hours. “I have an employee that has a two-hour commute to the office each way. Once day, she mentioned to me that she had to leave early to get home in time to make a family obligation. I asked her why and she detailed out her daily commute. I was shocked by the sheer difficulty it was for her to get to the office each day.”

Companies are certainly catching onto the trend, and most have the flexibility to work from home, if not at all the time, at least when needed. It’s changing the way we work, especially in the tech sphere. And while it may not be for everybody, employers may find they can save money and increase productivity for some workers. And for some employees, work-from-home benefits may be the difference between an enjoyable and stressful work life.


What It Is: Think Mary Kay (cosmetics), Pampered Chef (kitchenware), or Rodan + Fields (skincare) — over time, you build a base of clients to whom you sell a company's wares. "There are several reasons why I decided to become a consultant," says Rodan + Fields independent consultant Debbie Royer. "I had seen how much of a blessing the business had been to a friend of mine and my sister-in-law. Plus, everything can be done from my phone, and being a mom to a preschooler and an infant I don't have a lot of extra time to be sitting at a computer."

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