I am available to work at least 15 hours a week doing typing reports or whatever fits my abilities. In the past I have done many assorted jobs and spent 15 years in the Interior design field. I have worked outside in offices many years and am good on the telephone and keyboard on my tablet and if need be can get a computer if necessary. My experience in the working field covers an assortment of jobs. I am a retired senior lady.
But even if you don’t burrow down into copywriting, freelance writing is definitely worth another look. If you’re able to type fast, you should be able put together a decent blog post in about an hour (once you get the hang of it, which typically doesn’t take very long). If you charge a client $50 for that blog post (which is a pretty typical beginner/advanced beginner rate), you’ve just made $50 for an hour’s worth of work. And the best part is, many businesses will want to hire a writer for recurring work, so it’s not like you have to find a new client every time you want an assignment.
Isabella Biedenhan of Entertainment Weekly wrote that "...slinking beats and playfully sexy lyrics about convincing your partner to skip the boardroom for the bedroom" were notable in the song.[36] The sexual nature and double entendres present in its lyrics, was another point discussed by critics. Spencer Kornhaber from The Atlantic journal noted that "Work from Home" "is typical in portraying freaky bedroom fun as glorious mostly in the bounds of a relationship."[37] Katherine St. Asaph, Pitchfork, expressed an unsatisfied critic about its recording writing that "Fifth Harmony trades in the kind of pop-cultural press-quote feminism where the group can say they are out squash gender roles and “gender-institutionalized thinking” while recording a fantasy of a stay-at-home sexter reassuring the household breadwinner that he’s the boss at home."[22]
1. AccuTran Global – AccuTran Global is mostly known as a transcription company, which is fair since that’s mostly what they bring on independent contractors to do. However, they sometimes have data entry jobs as well, so it’s best to keep your eye out. Check the link for my overview of the company, detailing what it’s like for their transcriptionists: it’s likely to share similarities to what they expect of data entry specialists.
I am a health and safety coordinator, working full time in a 24 hour run facility, I am also a single mom. I have been living pay cheque by pay cheque for years even when I was working three jobs. Trying to pay off debts that I incurred while with my ex husband and ex boyfriend. I am exhausted and depressed that I am trying to help my children with their dreams, but don’t have enough funds to pay the rent, buy food or pay the bills. I am trying to pay off the credit cards and high interest rate loans that I feel stupid about. I would like to just earn the extra dollars when I am at home on weekends catching up with the household chores, and taking my son to his rep basketball games. I just want to be able to keep up on paying everything on time and to get out of debt quicker. If someone have something available to help me out I will be grateful. I was debt free once before and it felt great just keeping up and being able to take my kids out to dinner once a month as a treat. My dream is to buy my daughter her wedding dress, and to register my son into basketball camps, help my other son go back to school.
The online application process for these jobs—or perhaps “gigs” is the better word, since they're all for independent contractors—is pretty simple and straightforward with very little required of candidates. Some of these opportunities—like the micro-jobs—you could very well apply and start the same day. And these jobs require very little commitment and can typically be done on your own schedule.
But even if you don’t burrow down into copywriting, freelance writing is definitely worth another look. If you’re able to type fast, you should be able put together a decent blog post in about an hour (once you get the hang of it, which typically doesn’t take very long). If you charge a client $50 for that blog post (which is a pretty typical beginner/advanced beginner rate), you’ve just made $50 for an hour’s worth of work. And the best part is, many businesses will want to hire a writer for recurring work, so it’s not like you have to find a new client every time you want an assignment.
FlexJobs CEO Sara Sutton Fell was profiled as the Fairygodboss of the Week, and she said remote work helps her get outside and stay active: “I live in Boulder, Colorado, with my two boys, so when I’m not working, I love to get outside for some activity, either with them or for a little solo time. We mountain bike and hike, and I also love hot yoga.”
"Work from Home" is a song recorded by American girl group Fifth Harmony featuring American singer Ty Dolla Sign.[2] The song impacted contemporary hit radio four days after its initial release on March 1, 2016 and was released as the lead single from the group's second studio album, 7/27 (2016).[3] "Work from Home" was written by Daniel Bedingfield, Joshua Coleman, Dallas Koehlke, Jude Demorest, Tyrone Griffin, Jr., Alexander Izquierdo, and Brian Lee[4] with production from Coleman and Dallas Koehlke. The song is primarily an R&B track that incorporates elements of trap music and tropical house beats with lyrics depicting "work" as a euphemism for sex. Many music publications included it in their lists of best songs of the year.[5][6][7][8]
Several critics noted the song's style is comparable with the musical style of the hip hop producer DJ Mustard.[38][39][40] In a review published by the staff of Idolator, Robbie Daw called the track worthy based on previous singles with the titular name a called it the group's "most solid single to date." In a mixed-positive review, Carl Williott initially called the track a "DJ Mustard ripoff" but complimented the group for managing to make the song "their own" with their "subtle harmonizations adding some texture", he adds. Mike Wass shared similar sentiments and called it a "sleek and sexy bop with on-trend production" and an "insidiously catchy chorus" while praising the group's musical evolution.[41] Several publications thought it was a strong contender for song of the summer.[42][43][44] However, other critics were not so positive. Christopher Bohlsen of Renowned for Sound gave a negative review, saying that while vocal melodies in the verses were "satisfying", the chorus just "doesn’t sound interesting enough", calling it an "utterly standard pop song". Bohlsen gave the song a two-and-a-half out of five rating.[45]
Because lawyers are seeking people who match the profile of potential real-life jurors, online jury companies ask detailed questions of applicants. You should never disclose your Social Security number or credit card or banking info. Companies typically pay $10 to $60 to online jurors. Since most online jury companies won’t need a lot of jurors, signing up for multiple companies gives you a better chance of getting picked for “jury duty.” 
While most of these companies advertise that you can earn upwards of $18 or so an hour, the reality is that you're not going to make that much once you figure in your gas expenses and wear and tear on your car. Also, work may not always come in consistently. I would recommend doing more than one of these if you really want to make it worth your while.
How to Get It: You can apply directly through companies, such as Stella & Dot, a jewelry company that had over $100 million in sales in 2010, who is always in need of stylists. A few others include Avon (household and personal care), The Cocoa Exchange (chocolates and more), and Alice's Table (flowers). You can also visit the Direct Selling Association website — all the companies listed there agree to abide by a code of ethics, so they only offer legitimate opportunities. Typically reps make a small investment to get started (this is a legitimate and standard practice), and sometimes pay a fee for the merchandise being sold. After that you can work as much or as little as you want, and see profit based on how much you sell.
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